PBIS

“Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is a proactive systems approach to establishing the behavioral supports and social culture needed for all students in a school to achieve social, emotional, and academic success.”

The PBIS process has been described as:

  1. Identify the expected behaviors
  2. Teach, model and practice what those behaviors look like, sound like, and feel like
  3. Specifically praise appropriate behavior with private or public acknowledgement, and
  4. Measure outcome data to determine successes and barriers to reaching the desired goals.

PBIS and Our Musicals

Ben Franklin and Me

Ben Franklin and Amos use the Declaration of Independence as a way of “identifying the expected behaviors” within a free and fair country. This acts as a metaphor for the “expected behaviors” within a school community.

Honest Abe

As the villain tries to negatively influence Lincoln throughout his life, it is up to the audience to “identify the expected behaviors” followed by Lincoln “teaching, modeling and practicing what those behaviors look like, sound like and feel like.

The George Washington Follies

George, unsure of what kind of President he will be, turns to great personages of the past who “identify the expected behaviors” of a fair and compassionate leader. They then serve to “teach, model and practice what those behaviors look like, sound like and feel like.

The Wright Brothers

Wilbur and Orville have a number of disagreements throughout the course of the musical. They resolve their conflicts by respecting each others’ opinions and working together to achieve a common goal. In this way they “teach, model and practice what those behaviors look like, sound like and feel like.